Let’s Talk: Future Workforce – Books

Let’s Talk: Future Workforce – Books 2019-06-05T17:32:43+01:00

‘The Shift: The future of work is already here’ – Linda Gratton, Harper Collins Business 2011

‘The 100-Year Life’ – Lynda Gratton and Andrew Scott, Bloomsbury 2017

‘Gigged’ – Sarah Kessler, St Martin’s Press 2018

Books

‘The Shift: The future of work is already here’ – Linda Gratton, Harper Collins Business 2011
We are now facing a revolution in the way we work. A substantial schism in the past which is so great that the work we do will change – possibly so that in two decades our working lives will have been so REWORKED that they are unrecognisable.

This is not just about the impact that a low carbon economy will have on the way we work. It is also about how the nexus of technology and globalisation will work together with demographic and societal changes to fundamentally transform much of what we take for granted about work.

In this book Professor Gratton looks at the forces which are changing how we work; explains the potential impact on our future working life; and gives us guidelines on how to thrive in a REWORKED world.

‘The 100-Year Life’ – Lynda Gratton and Andrew Scott, Bloomsbury 2017
What will your 100-year life look like? Does the thought of working for 60 or 70 years fill you with dread? Or can you see the potential for a more stimulating future as a result of having so much extra time?

Many of us have been raised on the traditional notion of a three-stage approach to our working lives: education, followed by work and then retirement. But this well-established pathway is already beginning to collapse – life expectancy is rising, final-salary pensions are vanishing, and increasing numbers of people are juggling multiple careers. Whether you are 18, 45 or 60, you will need to do things very differently from previous generations and learn to structure your life in completely new ways.

Shortlisted for the FT/McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award, The 100-Year Life is a wake-up call that describes what to expect and considers the choices and options that you will face. It is also fundamentally a call to action for individuals, politicians, firms and governments and offers the clearest demonstration that a 100-year life can be a wonderful and inspiring one.

‘Gigged’ – Sarah Kessler, St Martin’s Press 2018
One in three American workers is now a freelancer. This “gig economy” — one that provides neither the guarantee of steady hours nor benefits — emerged out of the digital era and has revolutionized the way we do business. High-profile tech start-ups such as Uber and Airbnb are constantly making headlines for the disruption they cause to the industries they overturn. But what are the effects of this disruption, from Wall Street down to Main Street? What challenges do employees and job-seekers face at every level of professional experience?

In the tradition of the great business narratives of our time, Gigged offers deeply-sourced, up-close-and-personal accounts of our new economy. From the computer programmer who chooses exactly which hours he works each week, to the Uber driver who starts a union, to the charity worker who believes freelance gigs might just transform a declining rural town, journalist Sarah Kessler follows a wide range of individuals from across the country to provide a nuanced look at how the gig economy is playing out in real-time.

Kessler wades through the hype and hyperbole to tackle the big questions: What does the future of work look like? Will the millennial generation do as well their parents? How can we all find meaningful, well-paid work?

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Let’s Talk: Future Workforce Theme Lead

Jenny O’Neill

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